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Ferrari Type 250

Ferrari Type 250 - Over 10,000 Classic, Collector and Current Cars and Trucks at RemarkableCars.com

Ferrari Type 250

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder
RM Auctions
Location: Amelia Island, Florida
Auction Results March, 2009 $1,975,000

Ferrari Type 250 - Random Listings From Our Picture Gallery


1962 Ferrari 250 GTO For Sale

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO For Sale
1962 Ferrari 250 GTO For Sale 1962 Ferrari 250GTO S/N 3873 The GTO- of which fewer than 40 were produced and valued at upwards of tens of millions- is considered one of the best competition cars Ferrari ever built. This car in particular was commissioned by a high profile English collector once his GTO reached a staggering value . Fearing the car’s demise , this car was hand crafted using authentic GTO components, the engine from S/N 3873, and patterned after the original S/N 4115. This stellar car would go on to race such hallowed grounds as Goodwood, Spa Francorchamp, and the likes, and did so for several years without anyone knowing it was not in fact 4115. The car has subsequently been issue its FIA paperwork and is the finest GTO re-creation in existense and with the finest provenance no question. Owner magazine. Family Classic Cars 33033 Camino Capistrano San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675 Phone: 1 (949) 496-3000 Fax: 1 (949) 488-0523 Email us at: info@familyclassiccars.com Website: www.familyclassiccars.com
by Douglas

1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Scaglietti California Spyder

1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Scaglietti California Spyder
1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Scaglietti California Spyder
by Douglas

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Coupe

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Coupe
1959 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Coupe
by Douglas

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe
72,360.00 USD
Offered For Sale at the: Russo and Steele Collector Car Auction 2002, Scottsdale, AZ Russo and Steele 5230 S. 39th Street Phoenix, AZ. 85040 Phone: 602.252.2697 Website: www.russoandsteele.com Consignment # 1248 1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe Final Bid: $ 72,360.00 - Scottsdale 2002 Few lines and names throughout automotive history have epitomized the peak of performance and ultimate driving passion than that of Ferrari. Few models of the famed Pinin Farina - Ferrari collaboration have endured as timeless as the 250 GT Series. Marketed as the "Standard Road Car" of Ferrari beginning in 1958 the later version of the PF Coupe would feature "outside plugs" and disc brakes, being the first Ferrari's to enter the new age of these significant improvements in performance, safety, and design. This Coupe has enjoyed a sheltered history with benefit of a full cosmetic and mechanical restoration. A joy to own and drive, it's capabilities have been showcased with flawless performance on the recent Gauthier Road Rally.
by Douglas

1961 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder

1961 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder
1961 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder Photo By: Douglas Wilkinson Location: The Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance in Rochester, Michigan, August 7, 2005.
by Douglas

1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe

1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe
1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe
by Douglas

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe
165,000.00 USD
1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe RM Auctions Automobiles of Amelia Island Collector Car Auction Amelia Island, Florida March 13, 2010 AUCTION RESULTS: Lot 202 - Sold at a price of $165,000 240 bhp, 2,953 cc single-overhead camshaft V12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, front double wishbone suspension and semi-elliptic leaf spring and solid axle rear suspension, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.25" The first of the legendary Ferrari 250 GTs was introduced at the Paris Auto Salon in 1955. By 1956, Scaglietti, who had been building Ferrari's racing car bodies for several years, undertook construction of the lightweight Pinin Farina-designed production cars, of which the 1956 250 GT was the first. Scaglietti, as much a sculptor as a coachbuilder, may be credited with much of this model's aesthetic appeal, softening some of Pinin Farina's more emphatic lines to create a deft and cohesive design. Meanwhile, Carrozzeria Boano produced a notchback-style coupe, the later high-roof designs of which were designated "Ellena." Built through 1960, the 250 GT Coupe came to replace this angular notchback Ellena model and was both designed and produced entirely by Pinin Farina at their new Grugliasco plant. Elegant yet understated in design, the car became Ferrari's most commercially successful model. Notable design cues included a particularly long bonnet with chrome-trimmed headlights slightly set back into the wings. The rear of the car was a stylish yet conventional Pinin Farina design, housing a simple light cluster, while the interior, devoid of three-quarter windows, felt very much like a cabriolet fitted with a hardtop. Much attention was given to sound insulation with plush leather and extensive carpeting used throughout. A fresh-air heating system and twin-disc clutch were also introduced for the whole series in 1959. Not to be underestimated by virtue of its design, the 250 GT Coupe was a performer through and through. The car was fitted with the standard Colombo-designed 2,953 cc V12 engine, which, as always, was nothing short of a detuned competition powerplant. Fitted with three twin-choke Weber downdraft carburetors, compression was typically set around 8.8:1 with output reaching 240 hp at 7,000 rpm. With a top speed of 240 km/h, the 250 GT Coupe could reach 100 km/h in less than seven seconds. It was one of the fastest GT cars available, even beating offerings from Aston Martin, Jaguar and Maserati. The 250 GT Coupe we have the pleasure of offering here, a Series I example with an inside-plug engine and drum brakes, was completed in August 1959 and, according to a handwritten factory listing, delivered new to the German importer Auto Becker in Düsseldorf. Pinin Farina records indicate the car was delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut the same year. Between 1974 and 1975, the Ferrari Owners Club USA membership directories show the car as being owned by Brian A. Johnston of North Vancouver, British Columbia. The present owner acquired the car out of Canada in the 1980s and brought it with him to England before conducting a full nut and bolt restoration and refinishing the car in red with a tan interior, as evidenced by photographs of the restoration process. Following its completion, the car was shown at the Concours at Brocket Hall in England, where it won its class. The owner moved to the United States about 15 years ago and brought the car with him, rebuilding the engine and gearbox at Foreign Cars Italia about ten years ago. The car is reported to be in excellent condition throughout and is driven only sparingly by the vendor. The 250 GT PF Coupe is a superb grand touring Ferrari. It offers the same V12 performance as its fellow 250 GT models, with particularly elegant coachwork – and within a much more modest price range.
by Douglas

1963 Ferrari 250 GTE

1963 Ferrari 250 GTE
44,865.00 USD
Offered For Sale at the: Russo and Steele Collector Car Auction 2002, Monterey, CA Russo and Steele 5230 S. 39th Street Phoenix, AZ. 85040 Phone: 602.252.2697 Website: www.russoandsteele.com Consignment # 1541 1963 Ferrari 250 GTE Final Bid: $ 44,865.00 - Monterey 2002 vin. #250gte4305, believe car entered country in 73, ground-up restoration in late 80's, odo reading 14,000 kilometers (believe car has 114,000 kilometers), Enzo's first entry into the public touring car market. 300 cars produced in 61, 300 in 62 and 300 in 63. Original 12 cyl. 3 weber, 4 speed w/overdrive. Car sold in 90 for 80,000 to the gentleman that I purchased the car from. The car has less than 3,000 miles since its complete restoration I Rate the car as a solid #2. I have owned the car for 3 yrs. and have put new Pirelli's, tune up, master cylinder, several correct fuel lines, and some rubber hoses. Car has dark red leather interior installed 13 yrs. ago when the rest of the car was restored.
by Douglas

1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Coupe

1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Coupe
1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Coupe
by Douglas

1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Lusso Zagato

1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Lusso Zagato
1957 Ferrari Type 250 GT Lusso Zagato
by Douglas

Ferrari Type 250

The American market has always been tremendously important to Ferrari. From the marque's earliest days, Ferrari's reputation for fast, elegant and desirable automobiles has been, at least as strong in the U.S. as in Europe, largely through the efforts of Luigi Chinetti and importers like John von Neumann.

Chinetti, demonstrating the cars' performance with his North American Racing Team and the support of Von Neumann, Parravano and others, exploited the fertile American market for Ferrari's racing cars. The factory-affiliated teams' success generated sales both of new racing cars and recycled team cars. Ferrari developed specific models, such as the two-liter Monzas and Mondials, for the North American market and the racing classes that attracted wealthy amateur and some professional drivers who could afford to buy and race the very best. The success of Ferrari in America supported the factory's Grand Prix and sports racing car teams for years, just as it does today.

Ferrari's burgeoning reputation and racing success also encouraged the market for its road cars with, again, specific models like the 375 America and Superamerica series being developed to satisfy American buyers' desires for large engines and luxurious, long-legged gran turismos. The American dealers identified market niches and Ferrari built cars to fill them, small series of brilliantly integrated design and performance emphasizing the synergy among Ferrari and a few gifted designers and coachbuilders, notably Pinin Farina and Scaglietti.

At the same time Ferrari developed, built, raced and successfully sold a middle group of automobiles, dual-purpose gran turismos that traded luxury and creature comforts for light weight and high performance. Ranging from thinly disguised race cars like the 250MM and 340 Mexico, to sparsely-equipped road cars, Ferrari's GT racers performed admirably in the long distance open road races of the fifties. The first of these dual-purpose Ferraris to achieve some semblance of series production was the second series of 250 GT Europa with three-liter Colombo engine. Bodied by Pinin Farina, some 36 were built and they demonstrated their effectiveness in competition. But GT competition was becoming more intense, so in 1956 Ferrari introduced two new versions of the 250 GT: the Boano/Ellena-bodied coupe road cars and the lightweight racing berlinettas built in limited numbers by Scaglietti to a Pinin Farina design. The latter earned its stripes in the Tour de France and has become synonymous with that great event which covered routes around France with competitive events at tracks and hillclimbs to determine the ultimate winner. Built on the same 2,600mm wheelbase chassis as the Boano/Ellena, the 250 GT Tour de France dominated gran turismo competition and its combination of exceptional performance and good looks has made it one of the most desirable Ferraris.

At the same time Ferrari and Pinin Farina cooperated to create the first series of 250 GT cabriolets, the counterparts of the Boano/Ellena coupes. These luxurious and individually custom-built cabriolets were created for gentleman drivers who wanted open-air Ferraris to cruise the boulevards of sunny resorts with style and flair.

The American market, however, wanted something more than a fast, sparsely-equipped berlinetta or comfortably appointed cabriolet. Americans wanted a fast, sparsely-equipped convertible Ferrari sports car, the convertible counterpart of the Tour de France berlinettas. Whether it was Luigi Chinetti or John von Neumann who first pointed this out to Ferrari is immaterial. What is important, however, is that Ferrari responded with the California Spyder. Pinin Farina based the California Spyder on the design of the Tour de France. Scaglietti rendered Farina's design in metal and whether it is the raked windshield, or clean roofless line, Scaglietti's execution is without doubt one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever built.

California Spyder production began in 1958, and some 11 examples had been built by the time it was announced as a separate model in December 1958. One California Spyder was entered by NART at Sebring early in 1959 and driven by Richie Ginther and Howard Hively. It finished ninth overall (behind four Testarossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Le Mans in 1959 conclusively demonstrated the performance of the California Spyder as the NART-entered, alloy-bodied car driven by Bob Grossman and Fernand Tavano finishing fifth overall. Chinetti even found a way to make an impression on American drag racers with a sub-14 second steel-bodied California Spyder.

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Ferrari Type 250 - Over 10,000 Classic, Collector and Current Cars and Trucks at RemarkableCars.com