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Ferrari Type 250

Ferrari Type 250 - Over 10,000 Classic, Collector and Current Cars and Trucks at RemarkableCars.com

Ferrari Type 250

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder
RM Auctions
Location: Amelia Island, Florida
Auction Results March, 2009 $1,975,000

Ferrari Type 250 - Random Listings From Our Picture Gallery


1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder

1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder
1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder
by Douglas

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet, Series II

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet, Series II
1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet, Series II Body by: Carrozzeria Pinin Farina, Turin, Italy Blackhawk Auto Museum in Danville, California. Photos By: Douglas Wilkinson
by Douglas

1965 Ferrari 250 LM Race Car

1965 Ferrari 250 LM Race Car
1965 Ferrari 250 LM Race Car This Ferrari 250 LM won the 1965 Le Mans 24-hour race at Le Mans, France. It was driven by American Masten Gregory and Austrian Jochen Rindt. Photo By: Douglas Wilkinson Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Hall of Fame Museum, Indianapolis, Indiana
by Douglas

1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB

1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB
1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB
by Douglas

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO
1962 Ferrari 250 GTO
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1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe

1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe
1960 Ferrari 250 SWB Coupe
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1963 Ferrari California Spyder

1963 Ferrari California Spyder
1963 Ferrari California Spyder Photo By: Douglas Wilkinson Location: The Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance in Rochester, Michigan, August 7, 2005.
by Douglas

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Spyder California

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Spyder California
1961 Ferrari 250 GT Spyder California Location: 2009 Concours d'Elegance Amelia Island, Florida Date: March 15, 2009 Photos By: Douglas Wilkinson
by Douglas

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Tour De France

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Tour De France
1956 Ferrari 250 GT Tour De France Photo By: Douglas Wilkinson Location: The Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance in Rochester, Michigan, August 7, 2005.
by Douglas

1959 Ferrari California Spyder

1959 Ferrari California Spyder
1959 Ferrari California Spyder Photo By: Douglas Wilkinson Location: The Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance in Rochester, Michigan, August 7, 2005.
by Douglas

Ferrari Type 250

The American market has always been tremendously important to Ferrari. From the marque's earliest days, Ferrari's reputation for fast, elegant and desirable automobiles has been, at least as strong in the U.S. as in Europe, largely through the efforts of Luigi Chinetti and importers like John von Neumann.

Chinetti, demonstrating the cars' performance with his North American Racing Team and the support of Von Neumann, Parravano and others, exploited the fertile American market for Ferrari's racing cars. The factory-affiliated teams' success generated sales both of new racing cars and recycled team cars. Ferrari developed specific models, such as the two-liter Monzas and Mondials, for the North American market and the racing classes that attracted wealthy amateur and some professional drivers who could afford to buy and race the very best. The success of Ferrari in America supported the factory's Grand Prix and sports racing car teams for years, just as it does today.

Ferrari's burgeoning reputation and racing success also encouraged the market for its road cars with, again, specific models like the 375 America and Superamerica series being developed to satisfy American buyers' desires for large engines and luxurious, long-legged gran turismos. The American dealers identified market niches and Ferrari built cars to fill them, small series of brilliantly integrated design and performance emphasizing the synergy among Ferrari and a few gifted designers and coachbuilders, notably Pinin Farina and Scaglietti.

At the same time Ferrari developed, built, raced and successfully sold a middle group of automobiles, dual-purpose gran turismos that traded luxury and creature comforts for light weight and high performance. Ranging from thinly disguised race cars like the 250MM and 340 Mexico, to sparsely-equipped road cars, Ferrari's GT racers performed admirably in the long distance open road races of the fifties. The first of these dual-purpose Ferraris to achieve some semblance of series production was the second series of 250 GT Europa with three-liter Colombo engine. Bodied by Pinin Farina, some 36 were built and they demonstrated their effectiveness in competition. But GT competition was becoming more intense, so in 1956 Ferrari introduced two new versions of the 250 GT: the Boano/Ellena-bodied coupe road cars and the lightweight racing berlinettas built in limited numbers by Scaglietti to a Pinin Farina design. The latter earned its stripes in the Tour de France and has become synonymous with that great event which covered routes around France with competitive events at tracks and hillclimbs to determine the ultimate winner. Built on the same 2,600mm wheelbase chassis as the Boano/Ellena, the 250 GT Tour de France dominated gran turismo competition and its combination of exceptional performance and good looks has made it one of the most desirable Ferraris.

At the same time Ferrari and Pinin Farina cooperated to create the first series of 250 GT cabriolets, the counterparts of the Boano/Ellena coupes. These luxurious and individually custom-built cabriolets were created for gentleman drivers who wanted open-air Ferraris to cruise the boulevards of sunny resorts with style and flair.

The American market, however, wanted something more than a fast, sparsely-equipped berlinetta or comfortably appointed cabriolet. Americans wanted a fast, sparsely-equipped convertible Ferrari sports car, the convertible counterpart of the Tour de France berlinettas. Whether it was Luigi Chinetti or John von Neumann who first pointed this out to Ferrari is immaterial. What is important, however, is that Ferrari responded with the California Spyder. Pinin Farina based the California Spyder on the design of the Tour de France. Scaglietti rendered Farina's design in metal and whether it is the raked windshield, or clean roofless line, Scaglietti's execution is without doubt one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever built.

California Spyder production began in 1958, and some 11 examples had been built by the time it was announced as a separate model in December 1958. One California Spyder was entered by NART at Sebring early in 1959 and driven by Richie Ginther and Howard Hively. It finished ninth overall (behind four Testarossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Le Mans in 1959 conclusively demonstrated the performance of the California Spyder as the NART-entered, alloy-bodied car driven by Bob Grossman and Fernand Tavano finishing fifth overall. Chinetti even found a way to make an impression on American drag racers with a sub-14 second steel-bodied California Spyder.

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Ferrari Type 250 - Over 10,000 Classic, Collector and Current Cars and Trucks at RemarkableCars.com