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Roamer Cars

Roamer Cars
Roamer Cars - 1919 Roamer C-6-54 Rumble Seat Roadster

Pictures of Roamer Cars from car shows, car museums and classic car auctions across the U.S.

Roamer Cars


1919 Roamer C-6-54 Rumble Seat Roadster

1919 Roamer C-6-54 Rumble Seat Roadster
43,000.00 USD
Offered For Sale at the: RM Auction - Vintage Motor Cars at Meadow Brook Hall August 6, 2005, Auburn Hills, Michigan RM Auctions One Classic Car Drive Blenheim, Ontario N0P 1A0 Canada Phone: 519-352-4575 Website: www.rmauctions.com 1919 Roamer C-6-54 Rumble Seat Roadster LOT: 044 Chassis No. 17796 Not Sold at a high bid of $43,000 54hp Continental Red Seal inline six-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 128" Roamer was founded in 1916 by Cloyd Y. Kenworthy, an electric car distributor in New York, and Albert C. Barley, who was then working on the Haladay in Streator, Illinois. Kenworthy was searching for a gasoline powered car to sell because the electric car market was quickly receding. Not being pleased with what was already on the market, Kenworthy and Barley employed Karl H. Martin (who would later design the Wasp) to design their own car – the Roamer. Named after a famous race horse of the time, the Roamer was to exemplify the characteristics of a quality race horse. With long and low flowing lines and built with a bit more zest than other cars of the day, the Roamer was considered a performance-oriented vehicle. Throughout Roamer's existence it featured a radiator and grill that looked too similar to that of a Rolls-Royce to be coincidental. Roamer also made use of high quality Duesenberg engines from 1918 until 1924 and were advertised as being nothing less than “America’s Smartest Car”. Roamers were built for America’s elite. They set themselves apart from other car companies of that era by offering customers custom designs and an enormous palate of colors to choose from, for both exterior and interior styling. Fueled by the prosperity and opportunities of the roaring twenties, both Martin and Kenworthy left Roamer to pursue other ventures and Barley moved the company to Kalamazoo, Michigan. It was in 1921 that the company’s chief engineer, in a Roamer, clocked an unofficial land speed record at Daytona Beach, reaching 105.08 miles per hour! Barley was to leave Roamer by the end of 1924 and it did not take long for the effects of management instability to trickle down the company and adversely affect production. By the time the stock market crashed in 1929 Roamer had already exhaled its last breath having only produced 35 cars in 1928 and just two cars in 1929. The total Roamer production is estimated to be near 12,000 cars over its 14 year lifespan. The example offered here is a wonderful 1919 model, featuring a dual folding rumbleseat that neatly transforms the car into a sleek two-passenger roadster. This rare car has undergone an older but comprehensive restoration. The attractive ivory finish with black fenders is presentable, although showing some chips and nicks from usage. The black leather seats are in very nice order and the threepassenger rumble seat leather is as new and displaying a lovely patina. The Hayes wire wheels with red rims and stainless spokes are very attractive and contrast well with the ivory and black color scheme. The wood trim throughout the car is well-restored and in fine condition. The Continental Red Seal six-cylinder engine starts and runs easily, and the vendor reports the car drives very well. One of just 1,100 Roamers produced in 1919, this vehicle is a rare survivor perfect for show or tour use. With its attractive and rare coachwork, this Roamer is worthy of close inspection as only a handful exist today.
by Douglas

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